alonewithaghost
honeyed:

aconnormanning:

prokopetz:

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.
PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

A related fun fact: while old black and white film was under-sensitive to reds, it was correspondingly over-sensitive to greens. Actors whose characters were meant to have unnaturally pale complexions - like Morticia Addams - would often take advantage of this by wearing makeup with a green base tint in order to make their faces “pop”. This is where the modern trope of cartoon vampires having green skin comes from.

These are some fun fucking facts

But how would anyone ever even know they used green tinted makeup for that trope to stick? And wouldn’t that green tint be used for literally anyone who needed to have very white skin, not just monsters? I’ve always assumed that cartoon monsters were generally green (although I honestly never noticed cartoon vampires being green until I googled random stock clip art just now, they’re usually blue or purple much more of the time) because the Wizard of Oz and Frankenstein both set the precedent that monsters=green.I am dubious of this claim and can’t find anything to really back it up (the one really good source online about black and white film makeup actually seems to say that they used yellow for bright white faces) but old black and white film had all sorts of weird stuff they did regarding color, so it’s something I’m still curious about.

honeyed:

aconnormanning:

prokopetz:

anarchydiver:

The reason why the room was pink was because on black and white film, hues of red become dark shades of black. Pink is the perfect balance to give it that dark creepy grey.

PHOTOGRAPHY BITCHES

A related fun fact: while old black and white film was under-sensitive to reds, it was correspondingly over-sensitive to greens. Actors whose characters were meant to have unnaturally pale complexions - like Morticia Addams - would often take advantage of this by wearing makeup with a green base tint in order to make their faces “pop”. This is where the modern trope of cartoon vampires having green skin comes from.

These are some fun fucking facts

But how would anyone ever even know they used green tinted makeup for that trope to stick? And wouldn’t that green tint be used for literally anyone who needed to have very white skin, not just monsters? I’ve always assumed that cartoon monsters were generally green (although I honestly never noticed cartoon vampires being green until I googled random stock clip art just now, they’re usually blue or purple much more of the time) because the Wizard of Oz and Frankenstein both set the precedent that monsters=green.

I am dubious of this claim and can’t find anything to really back it up (the one really good source online about black and white film makeup actually seems to say that they used yellow for bright white faces) but old black and white film had all sorts of weird stuff they did regarding color, so it’s something I’m still curious about.